Historic Neighborhood Homeowners FAQ

What does it mean to live in a historic district?

What is the difference between Zoning Codes and the Historic Commission's Design Guidelines?

What does designation of a local Historic District do to my property values?

Are there benefits of owning property in a locally designated historic district?

As a property owner in a local historic district, can I still make changes to my property?

What is a Certificate of Appropriateness?

How do I acquire a Certificate of Appropriateness?

Do I need to hire professionals to present my plan to the Historic Preservation Commission?

Must I get a Certificate of Approval before I get a permit from another city department?

What is a Certificate of Appropriateness?

How do I acquire a Certificate of Appropriateness?

Do I need to hire professionals to present my plan to the Historic Preservation Commission?

Must I get a Certificate of Approval before I get a permit from another city department?

Why do I have to get a Certificate of Approval and a building permit?

How are "non-contributing" properties regulated?

Will I be able to replace my windows?

Is work on the interior of a building reviewed by the Historic Preservation Commission?

Are yard or landscape features reviewed by the Historic Preservation Commission? 

Does the Commission review what I do to the back of my house?

Will the Commission make me restore my old house to its original appearance?

Would I be allowed to build an addition to my property?

Isn't it more expense to preserve historic features then to replace them?

I hear I can't use vinyl on my home.  Why?

Are there any tax-breaks or financial assistance available from the City?

Who is on the Commission?

What if I have further questions?